HACC
Hamburg Airport Cargo Center
Hamburg

  • Client:
    Flughafen Hamburg GmbH
  • Architect: K2B-Architekten
  • Cargo handling hall :

    • Seamless hall structure with wide canopy
    • Prefabricated construction, shallow sleeve foundations
  • Extended building complex with handling rooms and offices:

    • Ramp facility
    • 2 pavilion buildings, 3 floors, basement, ground area 17 x 120 m each
    • Office wing, 3 floors, ground area 12.50 x 120 m
  • GFA: c. 29,000 m²
    Building costs: c. 28.5 mill. EUR
    Time: 2013 - 2014
  • Our scope:
    structural engineering

New air cargo centre for the north.

As an air cargo location, Hamburg Airport depends on its catchment area which has a radius of some 200 kilometres. It covers the whole of Schleswig-Holstein and large parts of Lower Saxony and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania as well as northern Saxony-Anhalt. The south of Denmark also relies on cargo flights to and from Hamburg.

With the new Hamburg Airport Cargo Center (HACC), Hamburg Airport has taken stock of this and made itself fit for the future. A total logistics area of about 20,000 square metres is available for handling companies and freight forwarders. Directly linked to the large air cargo halls, 44 loading ramp positions for lorries and some 36 parking spaces for truck trailers are provided.

The new air cargo centre is directly connected to the airport apron through a 60 metre long underpass under the road "Weg beim Jäger".

The building complex consists of a cargo handling hall, ramp facility, pavilion buildings and an office wing in front. The cargo hall has a ground area of 75 x 255 metres plus an 8.50 metre wide projecting porch. The structure of the hall comprises pre-stressed concrete trusses and pillars, clamped in shallow sleeve foundations. The other buildings were constructed as reinforced concrete skeleton structures on shallow foundations. In some cases they are provided with a basement formed as a "White Tank" concrete shell.

The HACC’s height borders directly on the security zones that must be kept free for air traffic. At take-off and landing, the aircraft fly so low overhead that one can almost read their serial numbers. A decisive time advantage for the organisation of air cargo handling?